The Virtual Sheik: A New Fantasy Horse Racing Idea

This article appears in the latest issue of the HANA Monthly, found here. Published and republished with mutual permission.


In my last post, my critique of current fantasy horse racing games centered on their formats that mirrored the experience of handicapping and betting instead of horse ownership. Improved variants allow for picking a small stable of horses for a season, perhaps adding jockeys and trainers to a fantasy team that earn points over the course of a season. Those games work, introducing an element of scarcity and valuation that can make for a successful contest. MyFantasyStable.com is one such game, though there are others. If those games have a flaw, it’s that many horses, trainers, and jockeys are either running for larger purses, start more runners, and ride more entries than other picks, thus overweighting luck versus skill in a given contest.

To this point, this evolution is more like successful games like Fantasy Golf or Fantasy NASCAR – fun games with clear rules and where an understanding of relative value can help a shrewd player succeed. The most successful fantasy games (football and baseball, then basketball) more closely replicate the experience of ownership. No horse racing game truly does this, but I think they could.

With that, I introduce my idea: the Virtual Sheik, so-named for the biggest-pocketed owners in the racing world. Here’s how I envision such a game would work:

1. Players start with a fixed pool of dollars to spend, say $1M, on horses currently in training who have run at least one race (with one exception).

2. Players would earn additional dollars for their stables by the purses that their runners earn.

3. The value of a given horse is determined by multiple factors, but the heaviest weighting would be on the value of the purses for which they have most recently run.

  • For example, to get Orb or Oxbow or Palace Malice, you’d have to pony up (pun intended) $1.5M or so to bring them into your stable. It would not be easy.
  • Maiden (MSW) runners could be had for $40-75K typically. These purse levels typically hold for other allowance runners.
  • Lower graded stakes or listed stakes runners would go for $75-300K
  • Most importantly, runners in claiming races would go for their most recent claiming price.

4. As the claiming game makes up the majority of races, this is where most of the action will occur. Just like the real game, if one of your horses runs in a claiming contest, it can be claimed by a competitor within the game. Similar rules would apply to the real claiming game:

  • For all horses, the claim must be put in before the race is run. This includes first-time starters in maiden-claiming races (which is the exception noted in 1. above)
  • If your horse is claimed, you get the claiming price added to your account. Its purse winnings for the race are yours.
  • If multiple claims are put in for a horse, the new owner is determined randomly.

5. For all non-claiming races, if a horse is not owned and a player tries to buy the horse for its calculated value, there is a short window for a “Monopoly-style” auction. Details:

  • In Monopoly, one of the least well-known rules is that, if you land on a property and don’t buy it for face value, it goes to auction among all players where it goes to the highest bidder. No one plays this way, but it’s in the rules of the game. Anyway…
  • After a player makes a bid for a non-claiming horse, there would be a 1- or 2-day “auction” for the horse where it would go to the highest bidder. It could be a live updated auction or a straight “second-price” auction like that on eBay. In this last scenario, every one who wants the horse can submit their maximum bid and purchases the horse for the 2nd highest bid + $1000.
  • The auction mechanism assures that no horse go below its true value (say a dominant MSW winner in a $40K race) and also allows for proper pricing on top-level stakes horses.

6. If a player wants to sell any horse to another player, all other players will be notifies and the auction rules above will apply.

7. To replicate the experience of ownership, dollars will be deducted monthly for each horse in a stable, based on their class. For example, $1000/month for a claiming horse up to $5000/month for a stakes horse. Owners would be required to maintain a minimum value of 3 months of expenses in their account.

8. Owners will get, say, $25000 per month added to their account to make sure total funds levels are sufficient to keep the game going. To mimic the breeding game of ownership, some special rules, apply, however to horses that are retired.

  • If a colt is retired sound and intact, at some point in the future, dollars will be credited to their account in some multiple of their 1st-year published stud fee. For example, if that stud has a first-year fee of $20K, his “retirement” value in the game might be $2M (a multiple of 100)
  • If a filly or mare is retired, the player is credited with a portion of their lifetime earnings. For example, a future broodmare with lifetime earnings of $300K might get an account credit of $150K.
  • Geldings would not get additional funds upon retirement.
  • I’m not entirely sure how to handle breakdowns and the like, perhaps a 10% insurance value. Like real life, that’s tough.

What I like about the above structure is that it creates a persistent game, which is what horse racing ownership is – there are no ownership seasons, no drafts, just auctions, claims, strategy and luck. It provides a framework for structuring games on multiple levels by simply varying how much money you have to start then pursuing different strategies to success. There could exist one big game, with thousands of players virtually owning most of the horse population and accumulating purses over time. Players could try to find the next Derby horse or build up their stable with multiple claiming level horses. Transactions, interactions, would be many. Or there could be multiple smaller games, with players starting with smaller budgets trying to build a stable on a budget. The opportunities are numerous.

On the technical side, this would be a much more involved game than those out there today. It is complex, but so is the world of horse racing. To me, it sounds like a lot of fun. There are at least three (Equibase, Brisnet, DRF) groups that have all the data to manage the game. Each would need an experienced company or partnership (Yahoo / NBC Sports, perhaps the new Fox Sports partnership with The Jockey Club) to pull it off and market it properly. It would require a lot of tweaks and experimentation. But I think it would be a tremendous amount of fun, and spur engagement from a base of sports-loving fans that don’t yet know what to make of horse racing. This would be an entree into our world – let’s give the proper amount of support it deserves.


As you may be able to tell from the last 2,000 words on the subject, an improved fantasy racing game is a passion of mine. Should an industry group or other interested party be interested in expanding this idea, I would love nothing more than to help bring it to life. The best way to contact me would be through Twitter (@mikedorr77), where I will see all racing-related inquiries. Thank you.

The Reality of Fantasy Horse Racing

Fantasy sports have been an enormously successful means of increasing fan engagement for the Big 3 professional sports organizations in the US: the NFL, the NBA and MLB. Fantasy baseball started the trend with the popularity of “Rotisserie” baseball, which has been around since 1980 (with a few predecessors), and I can remember playing a modified version as early as 1992 (I was 14). Fantasy football was the game that exploded the phenomenon, as its 4-month season with a weekly cadence, book-ended by a draft and playoffs, expanded its audience, being less time-intensive than its baseball counterpart.

Several racing industry organizations (the NTRA, Churchill Downs, the Breeders Cup, WinStar Farms, among others) have all launched and promoted “fantasy racing” games with the intention of attracting a new audience to the sport. I am not going out on a limb by saying that all these efforts that have thus far mostly failed to garner significant engagement from existing fans and have utterly failed in bringing fans of other fantasy sports to fantasy racing. This post’s title buries the lede – the reality of fantasy horse racing is that it sucks.

Successful fantasy sports games put the player in place of the owner.

For the most part, fantasy racing games fail because they replicate some other element of the sport, usually the handicapping and betting aspect. The current fantasy racing game being promoted is the Breeders Cup Fantasy Challenge; if you follow the link, you’ll see that the BC challenge is basically a weeks-long handicapping contest that is free to enter. It utilizes a few successful elements of fantasy football – weeks-long competition, free to enter, form up leagues – but the basic premise remains “pick a winner”.

The Churchill Down Road to the Roses contest tries to replicate the ownership experience somewhat by picking a stable of Derby contenders then earning points for their placing in Derby preps. The contest, however, almost infamously, spectacularly failed when one entrant picked Verrazano for all 6 spots in his stable, having an easy lead going into the Derby. Orb’s win prevented any major egg on CDI’s face, but still…

Successful fantasy sports games put the player in place of the owner by recreating situations that owners face.

In my estimation, good fantasy sports games do three things well: create scarcity, create differential value, and create interactions between players. These are all constraints faced by, say, an NFL owner. Bud Adams (a Nashville resident, I’m a Titans’ fan) can only employ 53 players, pay them a total of $123M, and can’t try to offer a player under contract with another team more money to play for him. A good QB is worth more than a good kicker, and The Blind Side taught us the value of left tackles. Still, players can be released, picked up, and traded and NFL general managers are constantly on the phones with their colleagues as they assemble their team.

Successful fantasy games create scarcity

In fantasy football, a player can play for only one team. A team can only have so many roster spots. A team can only start 1 or 2 players at each position.

I’m unaware of any fantasy racing game that actually prevents someone from picking a horse if it’s already been picked. It’s not really ownership if multiple people can “own” the same horse for purposes of a game.

Successful fantasy games create differential value

In most fantasy sports, differential value is created via draft – the players that are drafted earlier have greater value than those drafted later. In a draft format, luck has a big role – if there are, say, three clear-cut top picks, whoever gets the top 3 draft slots has a huge advantage. The innovation in response to that is the auction draft, where each team has a fixed pool of funds out of which to bid on players. Draft order doesn’t matter – if you want the top pick, you’ll pay for him but at the expense of filling out the rest of your roster.

Again, most fantasy racing games make little attempt to make one horse more “expensive” to own than another, largely because there is no scarcity in the first place

Successful fantasy games create interactions between players

The absolute best parts of fantasy football are, in order: the draft, the mid-week deals, the trash talk. Trying to improve your team is the essential element of the game, trying to win by acting as your own GM. A typical deal in FF might be a top wide-receiver and back-up running back for a top running back – the success or failure of a trade depends on the difference in opinion of value.

Have you ever traded/bought/sold/claimed a horse in a fantasy league? I think not.

Fantasy racing games simply do not capture the essential elements that make other fantasy sports compelling and fun. This is because they do not attempt to replicate, in any serious manner, the experience of owning and managing a racing stable. But here’s the great thing:

They could.